This Is What Will Never Do Because Do Is What This Never Will by Ed Fella

Wooden Dolls originally designed by Alexander Girard in 1963, produced today by Vitra

Wooden Dolls originally designed by Alexander Girard in 1963, produced today by Vitra

aqqindex:

Madelon Vriesendorp with Rem Koolhaas from Delirious New York, Circa 1975

aqqindex:

Madelon Vriesendorp with Rem Koolhaas from Delirious New York, Circa 1975

Lamp Chouchin design by Ionna Vautrin, product of Foscarini, 2011

Lamp Chouchin design by Ionna Vautrin, product of Foscarini, 2011

"We need to separate out the issues of critical practice and critical writing. Speaking in the most general terms, it is clearly desirable for designers to learn how to think critically about design. It is still unclear what the basis of this criticality could possibly be if a designer’s fundamental assumption is that everything just is what it is and nothing much can be done about it.

Critical thinking requires a sceptical approach to the object under consideration; it implies that something can and should be improved through any intervention; it must involve some degree of resistance to the way things are, however small-scale the design problem happens to be.”

An image never interests us as such.
Its relevance lies in the fact that it contains the sum of preceding dialogues, stories, experiences with various interlocutors,
and the fact that it induces a questioning
of these pre-existing values.
This is what makes for us a pertinent image. A good image should be in between two others, a previous one and another to come.

Postmodernism didn’t have much impact on graphic design until the middle of the 1980s. Initially, many designers thought it was just undisciplined self-indulgence […] But in fact it was a new way of thinking about design, one that instigated a new way of designing. Designers began to realize that as mediators of culture, they could no longer hide behind the “problems” they were “solving.”

[…] After the 80s designers may still choose to be anonymous, but they will never again be considered invisible. We are part of the message in the media. In the postmodern era we are not just mediators of information, but individuals who think creatively and visually about our culture.

extract from "Graphic Design in the Postmodern Era" by Mr. Keedy, published on Emigre no. 47, 1998

With or Without you.
This should be the title of the Saudi Arabia 2012 IKEA catalogue, were women have been totally erased from the pictures. Yes, you read correctly.

Comparisons between the Swedish and the Saudi Arabia pictures of the catalogue speak for themselves: simply no women and, when it gets too sad having a scene full of men only, no people at all.

“These pictures [are a] sad example that shows that there is a long way to go in terms of equality between men and women in Saudi Arabia,” says to Metro newspaper Sweden’s trade minister Ewa Bjorling.
And adds: “Women cannot be retouched away in reality.” Thank god.

Read more here

Abet Laminati advertising, published in Terrazzo, design and architecture magazine curated by Ettore Sottsass and Barbara Radice, 1988

Abet Laminati advertising, published in Terrazzo, design and architecture magazine curated by Ettore Sottsass and Barbara Radice, 1988

Series Diadainconsupertrafra, design Alessandro Mendini, product of Zerodisegno, 2004

Series Diadainconsupertrafra, design Alessandro Mendini, product of Zerodisegno, 2004

In our view, design should have a certain autonomy, an inner-logic that exists independently of the tastes and trends of so-called target audiences. As the ways to measure the taste of the public are becoming more refined every day, culture is in real danger of turning into a gigantic mirror that offers nothing but a false reflection.
Experimental Jetset in Helveticanism, interview by Rudy Vanderlans for Emigre Magazine, 2003

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